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Pebble Hand-Made Rattles
Our Price: $19.99
Pebble Hand-Made Train
Our Price: $24.00
Hathay Bunano, meaning hand made or hand knitted. This awesome organization aims to keep families together and in particular to keep mummies with their children by providing employment in a village setting close to their homes. Isn’t it just amazing how someone can come up with such a wonderful company that is supporting thousands of women in Bangladesh to work independently?

Samantha Morshed is the founder of the social enterprise, Hathay Bunano. She was born in the United Kingdom and educated at Oxford Brookes in physics. She made her first trip in 1992 to Bangladesh with the one who later became her husband. He wanted to show her where he had grown up. She found Bangladesh to be an amazingly vibrant, energetic, chaotic, colorful country that holds unlimited possibilities in making sustainable economic growth.

Shortly after her family moved to Bangladesh, she started the organization in 2004. Her interest in social enterprise started with a basic question: “How do you create sustainable employment without debt or radical change in lifestyle for rural women?” – She realized that morally it was necessary for her to put whatever limited skills she had to some use to help them in a small way. She has always loved crafts and the women of Bangladesh make beautiful things as part of their culture and heritage. So it was not such a great leap to teach some knitting and crochet skills and start to make toys that would likely have an eager customer base and could potentially bring sustainable and flexible employment to rural and disadvantaged women.

Soon enough her husband was working with her full-time setting up new rural production centers and arranging training courses as they were expanding. She mentioned: “Now sometimes, I miss those early days sitting cross-legged on the floor in a remote village teaching groups of women to knit and learning Bangla from them at the same time, but I’m excited about where Pebble now is and the hope it brings to all the women we work with.”

What started out as a question and a personal investment of $500, resulted three years later in an ongoing enterprise that created employment for over 3,500 women in Bangladesh. The goal is to become a catalyst for change, with simple commercial ideas, combined with inexpensive labor to deliver quality products and meaningful flexible employment. Thus, she was recognized for her work in the 2009 New Year's Honours list with an MBE (Member of the Order of the British Empire) from the Queen of England and is increasingly taking an active part in highlighting the alternative path to poverty alleviation: Social Entrepreneurship.

The success behind this social enterprise as a profitable business entity has been the prevention of economic migration, which has contributed to family ties. This is unlike the ready-made garment sector that has lured people to migrate to the urban areas. It now has a healthy and growing turnover and employs more than 3,500 women at 32 sites across Bangladesh. All profits are put back into the company and the women can earn 25% more than the Bangladesh legal minimum.
Hathay Bunano, meaning hand made or hand knitted. This awesome organization aims to keep families together and in particular to keep mummies with their children by providing employment in a village setting close to their homes. Isn’t it just amazing how someone can come up with such a wonderful company that is supporting thousands of women in Bangladesh to work independently?

Samantha Morshed is the founder of the social enterprise, Hathay Bunano. She was born in the United Kingdom and educated at Oxford Brookes in physics. She made her first trip in 1992 to Bangladesh with the one who later became her husband. He wanted to show her where he had grown up. She found Bangladesh to be an amazingly vibrant, energetic, chaotic, colorful country that holds unlimited possibilities in making sustainable economic growth.

Shortly after her family moved to Bangladesh, she started the organization in 2004. Her interest in social enterprise started with a basic question: “How do you create sustainable employment without debt or radical change in lifestyle for rural women?” – She realized that morally it was necessary for her to put whatever limited skills she had to some use to help them in a small way. She has always loved crafts and the women of Bangladesh make beautiful things as part of their culture and heritage. So it was not such a great leap to teach some knitting and crochet skills and start to make toys that would likely have an eager customer base and could potentially bring sustainable and flexible employment to rural and disadvantaged women.

Soon enough her husband was working with her full-time setting up new rural production centers and arranging training courses as they were expanding. She mentioned: “Now sometimes, I miss those early days sitting cross-legged on the floor in a remote village teaching groups of women to knit and learning Bangla from them at the same time, but I’m excited about where Pebble now is and the hope it brings to all the women we work with.”

What started out as a question and a personal investment of $500, resulted three years later in an ongoing enterprise that created employment for over 3,500 women in Bangladesh. The goal is to become a catalyst for change, with simple commercial ideas, combined with inexpensive labor to deliver quality products and meaningful flexible employment. Thus, she was recognized for her work in the 2009 New Year's Honours list with an MBE (Member of the Order of the British Empire) from the Queen of England and is increasingly taking an active part in highlighting the alternative path to poverty alleviation: Social Entrepreneurship.

The success behind this social enterprise as a profitable business entity has been the prevention of economic migration, which has contributed to family ties. This is unlike the ready-made garment sector that has lured people to migrate to the urban areas. It now has a healthy and growing turnover and employs more than 3,500 women at 32 sites across Bangladesh. All profits are put back into the company and the women can earn 25% more than the Bangladesh legal minimum.


PLEASE NOTE: As these items are all handmade, each item is unique and may not match stock photo.

Nee-naw, nee-naw. Our police car rattle is the just the right size for little hands to grab and shake. Hand-crocheted in soft blue and white yarn, it comes with a bright red siren on top.

At Pebble we like to think that our toys spread smiles worldwide: the ladies who make them in Bangladesh smile because the toys bring them work, the parents smile because the toys keep their babies happy and enable them to shop with a conscience and the babies smile – well you can see why! We hope you love this little rattle as much as we do.

All Pebble products are made in Bangladesh by the extremely talented and capable artisans at Hathay Bunano ps. We love their workmanship and we love rural Bangladesh. Pebble toys are our small contribution to supporting families in rural Bangladesh, to removing the need for economic migration to the cities and to providing women with flexible working opportunities which are close to their homes.

Pebble products are made entirely by hand with natural materials and as such there will be slight variations in size, colour and design in line with the unique nature of this product.

Materials: 100% cotton with 100% polyester fill.

Size: height approx 20cm, width approx 12cm

Care instructions: machine washable at 40 degrees and can be tumble dried on a low setting

Pebble Hand-Made Unicorn
Our Price: $38.99
Hathay Bunano, meaning hand made or hand knitted. This awesome organization aims to keep families together and in particular to keep mummies with their children by providing employment in a village setting close to their homes. Isn’t it just amazing how someone can come up with such a wonderful company that is supporting thousands of women in Bangladesh to work independently?

Samantha Morshed is the founder of the social enterprise, Hathay Bunano. She was born in the United Kingdom and educated at Oxford Brookes in physics. She made her first trip in 1992 to Bangladesh with the one who later became her husband. He wanted to show her where he had grown up. She found Bangladesh to be an amazingly vibrant, energetic, chaotic, colorful country that holds unlimited possibilities in making sustainable economic growth.

Shortly after her family moved to Bangladesh, she started the organization in 2004. Her interest in social enterprise started with a basic question: “How do you create sustainable employment without debt or radical change in lifestyle for rural women?” – She realized that morally it was necessary for her to put whatever limited skills she had to some use to help them in a small way. She has always loved crafts and the women of Bangladesh make beautiful things as part of their culture and heritage. So it was not such a great leap to teach some knitting and crochet skills and start to make toys that would likely have an eager customer base and could potentially bring sustainable and flexible employment to rural and disadvantaged women.

Soon enough her husband was working with her full-time setting up new rural production centers and arranging training courses as they were expanding. She mentioned: “Now sometimes, I miss those early days sitting cross-legged on the floor in a remote village teaching groups of women to knit and learning Bangla from them at the same time, but I’m excited about where Pebble now is and the hope it brings to all the women we work with.”

What started out as a question and a personal investment of $500, resulted three years later in an ongoing enterprise that created employment for over 3,500 women in Bangladesh. The goal is to become a catalyst for change, with simple commercial ideas, combined with inexpensive labor to deliver quality products and meaningful flexible employment. Thus, she was recognized for her work in the 2009 New Year's Honours list with an MBE (Member of the Order of the British Empire) from the Queen of England and is increasingly taking an active part in highlighting the alternative path to poverty alleviation: Social Entrepreneurship.

The success behind this social enterprise as a profitable business entity has been the prevention of economic migration, which has contributed to family ties. This is unlike the ready-made garment sector that has lured people to migrate to the urban areas. It now has a healthy and growing turnover and employs more than 3,500 women at 32 sites across Bangladesh. All profits are put back into the company and the women can earn 25% more than the Bangladesh legal minimum.
Hathay Bunano, meaning hand made or hand knitted. This awesome organization aims to keep families together and in particular to keep mummies with their children by providing employment in a village setting close to their homes. Isn’t it just amazing how someone can come up with such a wonderful company that is supporting thousands of women in Bangladesh to work independently?

Samantha Morshed is the founder of the social enterprise, Hathay Bunano. She was born in the United Kingdom and educated at Oxford Brookes in physics. She made her first trip in 1992 to Bangladesh with the one who later became her husband. He wanted to show her where he had grown up. She found Bangladesh to be an amazingly vibrant, energetic, chaotic, colorful country that holds unlimited possibilities in making sustainable economic growth.

Shortly after her family moved to Bangladesh, she started the organization in 2004. Her interest in social enterprise started with a basic question: “How do you create sustainable employment without debt or radical change in lifestyle for rural women?” – She realized that morally it was necessary for her to put whatever limited skills she had to some use to help them in a small way. She has always loved crafts and the women of Bangladesh make beautiful things as part of their culture and heritage. So it was not such a great leap to teach some knitting and crochet skills and start to make toys that would likely have an eager customer base and could potentially bring sustainable and flexible employment to rural and disadvantaged women.

Soon enough her husband was working with her full-time setting up new rural production centers and arranging training courses as they were expanding. She mentioned: “Now sometimes, I miss those early days sitting cross-legged on the floor in a remote village teaching groups of women to knit and learning Bangla from them at the same time, but I’m excited about where Pebble now is and the hope it brings to all the women we work with.”

What started out as a question and a personal investment of $500, resulted three years later in an ongoing enterprise that created employment for over 3,500 women in Bangladesh. The goal is to become a catalyst for change, with simple commercial ideas, combined with inexpensive labor to deliver quality products and meaningful flexible employment. Thus, she was recognized for her work in the 2009 New Year's Honours list with an MBE (Member of the Order of the British Empire) from the Queen of England and is increasingly taking an active part in highlighting the alternative path to poverty alleviation: Social Entrepreneurship.

The success behind this social enterprise as a profitable business entity has been the prevention of economic migration, which has contributed to family ties. This is unlike the ready-made garment sector that has lured people to migrate to the urban areas. It now has a healthy and growing turnover and employs more than 3,500 women at 32 sites across Bangladesh. All profits are put back into the company and the women can earn 25% more than the Bangladesh legal minimum.
Hathay Bunano, meaning hand made or hand knitted. This awesome organization aims to keep families together and in particular to keep mummies with their children by providing employment in a village setting close to their homes. Isn’t it just amazing how someone can come up with such a wonderful company that is supporting thousands of women in Bangladesh to work independently?

Samantha Morshed is the founder of the social enterprise, Hathay Bunano. She was born in the United Kingdom and educated at Oxford Brookes in physics. She made her first trip in 1992 to Bangladesh with the one who later became her husband. He wanted to show her where he had grown up. She found Bangladesh to be an amazingly vibrant, energetic, chaotic, colorful country that holds unlimited possibilities in making sustainable economic growth.

Shortly after her family moved to Bangladesh, she started the organization in 2004. Her interest in social enterprise started with a basic question: “How do you create sustainable employment without debt or radical change in lifestyle for rural women?” – She realized that morally it was necessary for her to put whatever limited skills she had to some use to help them in a small way. She has always loved crafts and the women of Bangladesh make beautiful things as part of their culture and heritage. So it was not such a great leap to teach some knitting and crochet skills and start to make toys that would likely have an eager customer base and could potentially bring sustainable and flexible employment to rural and disadvantaged women.

Soon enough her husband was working with her full-time setting up new rural production centers and arranging training courses as they were expanding. She mentioned: “Now sometimes, I miss those early days sitting cross-legged on the floor in a remote village teaching groups of women to knit and learning Bangla from them at the same time, but I’m excited about where Pebble now is and the hope it brings to all the women we work with.”

What started out as a question and a personal investment of $500, resulted three years later in an ongoing enterprise that created employment for over 3,500 women in Bangladesh. The goal is to become a catalyst for change, with simple commercial ideas, combined with inexpensive labor to deliver quality products and meaningful flexible employment. Thus, she was recognized for her work in the 2009 New Year's Honours list with an MBE (Member of the Order of the British Empire) from the Queen of England and is increasingly taking an active part in highlighting the alternative path to poverty alleviation: Social Entrepreneurship.

The success behind this social enterprise as a profitable business entity has been the prevention of economic migration, which has contributed to family ties. This is unlike the ready-made garment sector that has lured people to migrate to the urban areas. It now has a healthy and growing turnover and employs more than 3,500 women at 32 sites across Bangladesh. All profits are put back into the company and the women can earn 25% more than the Bangladesh legal minimum.
Pebble Stripey Blanket
Our Price: $59.00

These blankets were made to please babies and mummies alike. They are bright and colourful in super contemporary shades with a hand crochet edging. They are a great size as a swaddling blanket for newborns and a great size as a buggie blanket as your little one gets bigger. Why not team it up with a matching hat?

At Pebble we like to think that our toys spread smiles worldwide: the ladies who make them in Bangladesh smile because the toys bring them work, the parents smile because the toys keep their babies happy and enable them to shop with a conscience and the babies smile – well you can see why! We hope you love this little rattle as much as we do.

All Pebble products are made in Bangladesh by the extremely talented and capable artisans at Hathay Bunano ps. We love their workmanship and we love rural Bangladesh. Pebble toys are our small contribution to supporting families in rural Bangladesh, to removing the need for economic migration to the cities and to providing women with flexible working opportunities which are close to their homes.

Pebble products are made entirely by hand with natural materials and as such there will be slight variations in size, colour and design in line with the unique nature of this product.

Materials: 100% cotton

Size: height approx 85cm, width approx 95cm

Care instructions: machine washable at 40 degrees and can be tumble dried on a low setting